Thursday, April 23, 2009

Booking Through Thursday..... and a Lovely Award.......

Welcome to Booking Through Thursday, at http://btt2.wordpress.com/ A post where book lovers such as my self get together weekly to answer specific questions related to literature and books. If you would like to join our group, or you would like more information about us, just click on the above link to reach the official Booking Through Thursday web site.......

This week our questions are as follows:
"My husband is not an avid reader, and he used to get very frustrated in college when teachers would insist discussing symbolism in a literary work when there didn't seem to him to be any. He felt that writers often just wrote the story for the story's sake and other people read symbolism into it. It does seem like modern fiction just "tells the story" without much symbolism. Is symbolism an older literary device, like excessive description, that is not used much any more? Do you think there was as much symbolism as English teachers seemed to think? What are some examples of symbolism from your reading?"

I think that most writers do use symbolism in the sense that they write something symbolic or meaningful to them. They may include the names of certain streets, characters, towns, or something else that they wish to get across in the story. Whether the readers are able to pick up on the symbolism is quite another story. I think the English teachers had it right in their reference to authors and symbolism. It's up to the reader, and most certainly the literary experts, to draw those meanings out of any given work and determine the relevance or importance of it, if any........

I just finished reading 'Sunday at Tiffany's' where the authors, James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet, used an imaginary friend to represent or symbolize the emotional loneliness and dejection of the character Jane......

Famous literary works that come to mind would certainly include Thomas Wolfe's 'Look Home Ward Angel' and F. Scott's Fitzgerald's 'The Great Gatsby.".......

'The Great Gatsby' is filled with example after example of symbolism. Fitzgerald uses the seasons to symbolize different episodes in Gatsby's life. The novel begins in the spring and ends in the fall. The elegant homes in the story are used to symbolize wealth. At one point Gatsby goes to a meeting wearing a silver shirt and gold tie yet another symbol of wealth. Gatsby always seems to be on the outside looking in which symbolizes the fact that he can never fit in to the society of the rich and famous because he wasn't born with entitlement or a 'silver spoon.' The automobile is still another symbol of wealth and status. There are many, many other examples of symbolism in this book, to many quite frankly to mention here......
I'm really looking forward to what all of you have to say.....
Happy Booking Through Thursday everyone!.....


This very lovely award was given to me by my friend Zetor at http://zetor-mogsblog.blogspot.com/ It is a 'Super Comments Award.' Thank you very much Zetor! It was very thoughtful of you to think of me. If you are a regular commenter here at Charli and Me I hope you will pick up this pretty award for yourself. Your comments mean a lot and are greatly appreciated....
I hope all of you have a happy and blessed day!.....
With warmest regards, Carol

5 comments:

Vee said...

Nice post and interesting to contemplate. (I do think that some men find it hard to think in terms of metaphor and simile, but they use them all the time. That's what idioms are after all.)

Congrats on your award. You do make sweet comments!

Anne said...

Your answer was very interesting. It's funny because I just found out this morning that the book 'Alice the Adventure in Wonderland' has mathematical symbolisms. Who would have thought?
Congrats on winning your award. Oh I hope you don't mind =) if I put this commenter award on my sidebar. Thanks for passing it along! Have a great day!

Janet said...

I loved 'Gatsby' -- and it's such a great example for this week's question!

Congratulations on your award!

Rosezilla said...

Sometimes I think there is more symbolism than story, and other times I think people read way too much in to things. But sometimes you find a clever author that weaves symbolic meaning in to a beautiful story, and then you find a treasure!

Aaydens Mommy said...

I really liked your post this week. It is funny because in my American Novel class we are getting into symbolism of the novels. Sometimes it is very hard for me to see the symbolism, but I just finished reading the Great Gatsby again for my class and you are right...that novel has plenty of things that just pop out at you when you read it. I love that book.

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